Better Weather and Breaking Away from Grief

By: Matthew Funeral Home
Monday, April 8, 2019


Winter is finally behind us. The winter months are often very hard for those who are grieving. Death occurs most often in the month of November, and then we have Thanksgiving and the winter holidays to really feel the impact of those we lost, as we realize there is one less person at the table. On top of all of that, shorter days and frigid weather makes us feel isolated and want to stay at home. Now that Spring is here, you can more easily take a step in the right direction towards recovery. What will be discussed here are more common ways to help yourself overcome grief in the Spring. 

Taking a Walk

Exercise is a great way to start breaking out of your despair, but it can be a daunting task to start exercising more. Start by attempting to take a walk every once in a while. Try to enjoy the nice weather, be in the sun more, and just breathe in the fresh air. Being outside and taking walks have shown to help those dealing with grief feel better.

Sit in a Park

Much like walking can help, going out to a park and just watching the ducks on the water, or the budding leaves rustle in the wind can be a very peaceful and relaxing process. Calming experiences in fresh air and a natural setting can be a good way to help you overcome sorrow.

Experience Something New

Take some friends or family, and try to make some new memories by trying something new. Try out a new hobby, or try setting up a game night with your loved ones. Surround yourself with people who care about you, and try to have fun. It’s OK to have fun, and to grieve. You shouldn’t feel guilty for trying to have fun while you are in mourning. 

Learn a New Skill

The feelings of success and triumph in learning a new skill can be very refreshing. Try learning a new skill or hone a skill you are not proficient in. Take a class in cooking, or art. Learning a skill can also be a way to connect with those we’ve lost. If there is something that your loved one took a lot of pride in doing; you may want to attempt that. It can make you feel closer to them, in a healthy and more positive way.

Take a Trip

Take a trip with your friends or family, maybe even somewhere new. Whether it’s a weekend road trip to another state, or a weeklong vacation. If your responsibilities can allow you to take a vacation, however long or short, try to do so. New experiences can be a way to break out of the rut you create for yourself during bouts of grief.

Don’t Push Yourself

Everyone experiences grief differently, and everyone has different ways to cope with it. Grief takes different lengths of time for everyone. You should not try to force yourself through grief. Go at your own pace. Try to experience life, and try not to let it go by.

 

The author of this post is not a professional therapist or counselor. For assistance in finding a grief counselor that is right for you, there are a number of resources out there. For our Grief Resource center, written by Dr. Bill Webster, click here
For almost 50 years, Matthew Funeral Home has been serving the Staten Island community. We can help with almost every aspect of your loved one’s memorial service. Our family is here to serve yours, every step of the way.
 

Leave a comment
Name*:
Email:
Comment*:
Please enter the numbers and letters you see in the image. Note that the case of the letters entered matters.

Comments

Please wait

Previous Posts

Funeral Planning for the LGBTQ+ Community

When it comes to end-of-life services, it is important to have a plan in order. This can be especially true for many LGBTQ+ people. In the event of your passing, your wishes should be upheld for yo...

Identifying Signs of A Stroke

Stroke is a leading cause of death in the US, killing 1 person in America every 3.5 minutes. The risk of stroke can increase as you age. For the safety of you and your loved ones, it is important t...

Donating Your Body To Science

Body donation is a process that very few Americans decide to participate in. But, it is a practice that can lead to advances in medical science, improved medical training procedures, and more. This...

Using Coping Mechanisms for Grief

When you hear the term “Coping Mechanism,” it is often in a negative context. However, that is not always the case. Coping mechanisms can help you deal with the short-term effects of grief. When us...

What To Expect at a Graveside Burial Service

A graveside burial service, also sometimes referred to as a committal service, is an essential part of the funeral service for some cultures. Primarily seen in catholic services, the commital is a ...

Oversized Caskets FAQ

Caskets are generally designed to fit a wide assortment of body types. However, some people may require an oversized casket. An oversized casket is used if an individual’s height, weight, or width ...

Flying With Cremated Remains

Traveling with cremated remains, or cremains can have its challenges. Whether you are moving to a new state or country or bringing your loved one home with you, it is important to understand the pr...

Processing Grief Through Reading for Children

Grief can be hard at any age, but for children and young teens, expressing and processing grief can be especially challenging. It is a very complex emotion, and some children may not be able to ful...

Searching for the Right Grief Counselor

The passing of a loved one can be incredibly painful. The grief of loss often seems unbearable. After the death of someone close, some extra guidance can be helpful. Grief counselors assist those w...

Valentine's Day Without Your Significant Other

Holidays can often be a trigger for grief after the loss of a spouse or long-term partner. Memories of holidays together can pop up from store displays, themed commercials, and more. With Valentine...