Common Questions About Organ Donations

By: Matthew Funeral Home
Monday, May 13, 2019


Every day, over 100,000 people wait for organ and tissue transplants. You can save up to 8 lives when you become a donor. Donating your organs when you pass away can be a great way to provide a second chance at life to others.

Who Can Donate?

Anyone, regardless of age, race, or gender can become an organ donor. Organs and tissue that can’t be used for transplantation, due to advanced age or disease, can often be used to help find cures for serious illnesses. Those with diseases such as diabetes, HIV, Alzheimer’s and more can contribute to the cure.

Will Being A Donor Affect My Treatment in a Hospital?

If you go to a hospital for treatment, they can not treat you any differently. The primary goal of the hospital is to ensure that you are treated to the best of their ability. Being a donor will not affect your treatment. It also will not override any Living Will information or Advanced Directives that you have established. Donation is not considered until all efforts to save a person have failed. The transplant team does not have any involvement in the patient’s care prior to death; and is notified only after death has occurred. The hospital also needs the consent of the donor’s family before proceeding with organ donation.
Transplant teams are only brought in upon the death of the donor. A hospital can not take donated organs if you are in a coma. In the event that you become brain dead, the irreversible loss of all functions of the brain, it will be up to your Living Will to determine whether to halt life support. If you do not have a living will established, the hospital will need to receive consent from your next of kin.

Does Organ Donation Affect My Funeral Arrangements?

Organ donation will not affect funerary plans. Organ donors can still have an open casket funeral. The process of removing the needed organs is done with care and respect. You can still be buried or cremated, as you wish.

Is there a Cost to being a Donor?

You do not have to pay to register as a donor. Your estate will not be charged for the removal of the donated organs. Neither you nor your family will receive payment for your donation. Costs for the removal procedures are paid by the recipient’s insurance program directly.

How Does my Religion Feel About Organ Donation?

All major Western religions support donation as a final charitable act, and approve of donating your organs. If you have more questions about your faith and organ donations, speak with a member of your clergy.

How Do I Sign Up as a Donor?

First, tell your family that you want to become a donor. Sign and date the back side of your driver's license and tell your family you want to be a donor. To have this designation included on your driver’s record, go to the DMV website for your state. You can visit the New York donor page here. 
For almost 50 years, Matthew Funeral Home has been serving the Staten Island community. We can help with almost every aspect of your loved one’s memorial service. Our family is here to serve yours, every step of the way. 

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