Helping a Friend Deal with Grief

By: Matthew Funeral Home
Monday, June 10, 2019


You try to prepare yourself for anything the world may throw at you. Grief is always hard to deal with yourself; but what about your friends? Sometimes, your friend may experience a painful loss. It can be a challenge at times to help a friend who is suffering from extreme grief themselves. How do you prepare to be there for others?

Being There for Them

We all experience grief differently. But we also try to console others in a variety of ways. You may not know what is the best way to cheer up a friend who is experiencing grief. It can be hard for you to see their friend in that position. Being there for a friend in need can be an important part of their healing process. They may not always show it at first, but grieving person will often appreciate your assistance after some time to heal. 

Taking Them Out

When a friend suffers from a great loss, they often need their friends to pick them up afterwards. After a few days of mourning, you and your friends should take your grieving friend out. Go to their favorite restaurant, or do their favorite activity. Distractions from the pain of loss can be very helpful in the healing process. Loss can weigh heavy on their mind. Spending time with your friend, and enjoying a fun activity can help them feel more like themselves.

Remembering their Loved Ones

Some people feel better about a loss by looking at old photos or spending time talking about memories of their loved one. See if your friend wants company while doing this. Spend time with your friend; watch their loved one’s favorite movie with them, be a shoulder to cry on if they need it.

Clearing Out the House

It can be difficult to get rid of a loved one’s belongings after they pass. Your friend may need help letting go of some of those possessions. Old clothes, books, collections, and more need to be sorted through. It may be arduous, but your friend will need help going through it all. Help them sort through what they should keep, give to other family members, donate, or throw out. It can be hard to separate themselves from their loved one’s possessions. Some people feel that throwing their stuff away is akin to throwing their loved one away. This is why a close friend should help them with such a task. You should be there to help them overcome feelings of guilt in getting rid of their loved ones stuff.

 

The author of this post is not a professional therapist or counselor. For assistance in finding a grief counselor that is right for you, there are a number of resources out there. For our Grief Resource center, written by Dr. Bill Webster, click here
For almost 50 years, Matthew Funeral Home has been serving the Staten Island community. We can help with almost every aspect of your loved one’s memorial service. Our family is here to serve yours, every step of the way. 

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