Memorialization Options for Cremation

By: Matthew Funeral Home
Monday, June 17, 2019

Whenever a loved one passes away, their friends and family often look for ways to memorialize them. As cremation becomes more and more popular, families often look for new ways to celebrate the life of the deceased. In this article, we will discuss alternative options to keeping the cremated remains of your loved one at home. Before choosing any of these options, consider what your loved one would have wanted for their remains. You want to honor their memory to the best of your ability. 

Urns

Urns can be a beautiful and personal way to keep the memory of a loved one alive. The right urn can be a wonderful addition to a mantle piece, and a good way to keep a loved one close to you at home. There are also miniature urns to which ashes can be distributed to multiple members of the family.

Keepsake Memorial Jewelry

After a loved one dies, it is natural to want to feel close to them. Memorial Jewelry allows you to always keep your loved one with you. Often made into pendants, rings, or bracelets; these items contain hollow spaces that can be filled with some of the cremains. Matthew Funeral Home offers a wide selection of cremation jewelry as well as other memorial keepsakes for families looking for a unique and meaningful way to stay connected to those they have lost.

Memorial Tattoos

Tattoos are often a way that many people immortalize the memory of their loved one. Today, some artists can mix a small amount of cremains into the ink used for a tattoo. This takes a memorial tattoo to the next step. Much like memorial jewelry, this is a way to keep your loved one close to you always.

Planting a Tree or Flowers

Ashes can be planted with trees or in flower gardens. Ashes help plants grow, and provide a very green way to take care of remains. Incorporating ashes into a tree planting can be a beautiful way to keep their memory alive. Every time you see the plants given life by your loved one, you will remember them.

Spreading Ashes

The spreading of ashes is a very common practice in America. Ashes are often spread in gardens, your loved one’s favorite spots, at sea, and more. Consider your loved one’s life and where they might want their remains to be spread. Follow legal guidelines when choosing where to spread ashes. You can’t just spread ashes anywhere.

Travelling With Ashes

If you need to travel with ashes on a plane, follow TSA guidelines. The TSA requires ashes to be in an urn that can be x-rayed. Biodegradable urns are often the best option for this. Your funeral home can help you choose an urn that is good for transporting remains through the airport. While not required, it is better to let the TSA know that you are going to be travelling with an urn ahead of time.

Shipping Ashes

Additionally, you can mail ashes, or drive with them. When you do so, there are laws that you must follow. As long as you are driving within the USA, you shouldn’t have too many issues, so long as the urn is tightly sealed and strong. When mailing ashes, you will need to follow certain guidelines from the USPS. The USPS is the only service that can be used to legally mail ashes in America. 

 

For almost 50 years, Matthew Funeral Home has been serving the Staten Island community. We can help with almost every aspect of your loved one’s memorial service. Our family is here to serve yours, every step of the way.

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