Choosing Your Loved One's Funeral Clothing

By: Matthew Funeral Home
Monday, September 30, 2019

When you are arranging a funeral for a loved one, the final clothing they will wear is one aspect that is often overlooked. The burial clothes that you choose can be one more way to present who they were in life, and will make a lasting impression on those who attend. If your loved one did not make their final clothing preferences clear, you and your family will have to decide what they should be wearing. When making funeral arrangements for your loved one, your funeral director can help you pick the right attire.

Religious and Cultural Requirements

Religious and cultural attire is often the first step in deciding the clothing choice for your loved one. Religions such as Islam, Judaism, and Hinduism have specific hairstyles and clothing requirements. If your loved one was religious, their attire should follow those specifications. Most christian sects do not have religious attire suggestions or requirements; but many christian families like to put a cross pendant around the neck of their loved ones, or a set of rosaries within the hands.

Uniforms and Badges

Some occupations and organizations represent themselves with a uniform; and it is not uncommon for members of those groups to be buried in such attire. Police officers, firefighters, and military servicemen are some examples of occupations where a uniform is often included as the burial attire. Some groups may have a form of uniform attire or representation in the form of a badge or pin that is often included in burial attire. 
Many volunteer organizations allow for membership pins to be worn as part of the final attire. Rotary and Knights of Columbus pins, for example, are often presented on the lapel of the deceased. If your loved one is an Eagle scout, their medal can be a part of the final attire. The metal should be pinned above the left breast; either on the sport coat or on the pocket of their shirt

Keeping their Style in Mind

Most families choose a suit for men, and a conservative dress for women as burial clothing. But you should also consider their personal style. You should consider your loved one’s wishes, and the type of memorial service. As more people choose to have non-traditional services, it is becoming more acceptable to dress the deceased in less formal attire.
Consider favorite clothing, colors, and their style; even if it doesn’t really fit with traditional funeral attire. Did they have a favorite tie or watch? A favorite hat? These items could be worn or included inside the casket, to highlight the personal style that made your loved one who they were. Rings, earrings, bracelets, and more are commonly worn as a part of burial attire. 

Keepsakes

If you’d like your loved one to wear a special item during the ceremony, but not be buried with it, be sure to notify your funeral director in advance. To ensure that a precious keepsake or family heirloom does not get buried with your loved one unintentionally, consider using these special items during the viewing only and not in the funeral ceremony. Family rings and important momentos are often kept with a loved one until after the viewing, where they can be returned to the family before the burial.

For almost 50 years, Matthew Funeral Home has been serving the Staten Island community. We can help with almost every aspect of your loved one’s memorial service. Our family is here to serve yours, every step of the way.

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