Cell Phone Etiquette at Funerals

By: Matthew Funeral Home
Monday, August 3, 2020

Funerals are a time of mourning, but they can also be a source of reconnection for friends and family. As such, it can feel like the time to pull out your phone and reconnect with those you have not seen in a while. Using your phone during a funeral can seem disrespectful to the grieving family, especially if used in excess. It is important to understand phone etiquette at a funeral, so that you do not upset those in mourning. 

Phone Volume

Your phone should be set to silent, if not off completely. A phone set on vibrate can still be heard during quiet moments, such as a service or eulogy. It is best to keep the volume off. If you need to be accessible during the service, walk out of the room and check your phone periodically, but do not walk out during the eulogy, except in the case of an emergency. 

Reconnecting with Family and Friends

It is common at funerals to see loved ones that you may have not connected with in some time. It can be a good idea to quietly and politely exchange contact information during the funeral, as long as you are not doing this during the service. If possible, exit the viewing room to do this. For more on reconnecting with loved ones after the funeral, see our article here.

Photos and Video

Overall, it is best to avoid taking photos or video at a funeral, unless specifically asked to do so by the immediate family. Taking photos, selfies, or recordings of the funeral or services can be considered extremely disrespectful. Likewise, avoid posting on social media about the funeral. If you want to make a post regarding the loss of your loved one, consider doing this beforehand, or after you leave the funeral home.

Young Children and Phones

It is common for parents to hand a young child a phone to watch videos or play games to keep them quiet during family gatherings. This is not a good idea during a funeral. It is important to help your child understand the importance of a funeral. Funerals can be an important teaching moment for young children. Not only would it be considered disrespectful for your child to be on a device at the funeral, you as a parent would be missing an opportunity to impart a lesson of solemn reverence to your child. For more information on talking to your child about death, visit our article here

During the Service or Eulogy

When the funeral service is announced, ensure that your phone is silenced or off. During a service, the showing of a memorial video, or a eulogy, avoid checking your phone. It is incredibly disrespectful, especially to the people who are speaking. Public speaking can be difficult, especially while in mourning. It is best to avoid disrespecting the family of the deceased by pulling out your phone during services.

For almost 50 years, Matthew Funeral Home has been serving the Staten Island community. We can help with almost every aspect of your loved one’s memorial service. Our family is here to serve yours, every step of the way.

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