Freedoms of Ceremony During the Pandemic

By: Matthew Funeral Home
Monday, June 22, 2020

    Amid the novel coronavirus pandemic, the whole nation is feeling losses. Many families were separated from their loved ones as they fought a losing battle to this disease. Additionally, you may not have been able to receive comfort during your initial grief from those closest to you, because of the barriers of social distancing. If you couldn’t have a funeral during the initial loss of your loved one; or if you felt that the ceremony you had was incomplete or too small; you can still have the ability to hold a ceremony for your loved one. As New York moves towards reopening, you have the freedom to have a proper ceremony to honor your loved one.

Embracing a Ceremony

    Funerals and memorial services allow you and your family to acknowledge the loss and provide you with the support of caring friends and family. Throughout history, virtually every human society had some type of ceremony to mourn those lost. We need each other now more than ever, as we socially distance ourselves.

Immediate, Private Ceremonies

    If you were not able to hold a ceremony after the passing of your loved one, you can have a private ceremony with loved ones now. You may want to ask your family’s spiritual leader or an officiant to join your loved ones for the ceremony. Consider using Zoom, Skype, or another video chat service to bring family and friends together. Even a candle-lighting ceremony in your home can be a cathartic experience that helps you begin the healing process.

Planning a Ceremony to be Held Later

    If you do not want an immediate private ceremony; you can choose to hold one when the pandemic lessens, or when the restrictions lighten. This can also be important if you have family in states or countries where traveling is limited. A delayed ceremony is still healthier for your family than opting not to have one at all.

Repast after the Pandemic

Most families find comfort in coming together around the dinner table, be it at a restaurant or at home. While many restaurants cannot serve at high capacities, it may be best to hold off on having a large dinner together until this trying time has passed. It is best to keep larger gatherings to a minimum during this time; so even a meal at home with the whole family.

Having More Than One Ceremony

    Ceremonies are key to the grieving process. Whether large or small, the sense of love and community one feels during a funeral or memorial is vital to moving through the grieving process. It is perfectly acceptable to have more than one ceremony for your loved one, especially during these difficult times. For now, you may want to hold a smaller, online ceremony now; and an in-person ceremony in the future. If your loved one is cremated, you may decide to have a scattering ceremony. 

Planning a Ceremony to Fit Your Family’s Needs

    Your family should hold a ceremony that honors your loved one and celebrates their life. Many people have funerary wishes, and families have their own traditions and needs. Whether these be based on spiritual, religious, cultural, or secular traditions; the way that you and your family come together to mourn the deceased can be important. 

The Freedom to Feel

Because of the pandemic, and the restrictions that come along with it, many people have to deal with challenging and limiting circumstances as they lose a loved one. Families across the globe lost family members in hospitals while being barred from visitation. It is a rough time for all of those who have lost loved ones during this unprecedented pandemic. You may be experiencing feelings of guilt, anger, regret, helplessness, despair, and more in addition to coping with grief. Naturally, your feelings are complicated, because the circumstances are complicated. Expressing your feelings can be an important step in overcoming them. Talking with family, friends, or even a grief counselor about these feelings can help you work through them. 

Gathering Photos and Mementos

    During these times of social distancing and isolation, it can be hard to not feel alone; especially after the loss of a loved one. Looking through old photos and mementos of your lost loved one can help you remember good times with them. It is also a good idea to gather photos, videos, memorabilia, and the like; in the event that you hold a service once restrictions are lifted or lessened. 

Reaching Out

While it can be easy to feel alone during the pandemic, a simple phone call can make a huge difference. Isolation is not helpful for the grieving process. Humans need an emotional community in order to work through feelings of grief properly. Video calls are the safest substitute for face-to-face contact, and being able to see a family member or friend can be healing. Consider gathering stories of your loved one by talking with family and friends over the phone. These can help you feel more connected to the deceased, and can also assist you in preparing a eulogy for a memorial service. But, any way you can connect with family and friends can be a good thing. Even sending out a text or chatting over email can help you and your loved ones feel connected during your time of mourning. 

Consider reaching out to loved ones regarding the planning of a funeral or memorial ceremonies for your loved one. Asking for help is never a bad idea, especially when it comes to grief. You may need a hand in planning, and contributing to the ceremony in a meaningful way can help your family members feel better themselves. 

Moving Towards Healing in Grief

    Death during this pandemic can make you feel like you are in a state of limbo. It is hard to feel like the world is progressing towards normalcy when your own life is thrown even further out of whack. A ceremony for your loved one can help you and your family find a degree of progress towards healing. It is important that you and your family find the time to give attention to the very natural and necessary grief that you feel. Acknowledging grief and your pain during these trying times is one of the first steps towards healing. 

 

The author of this post is not a professional therapist or counselor. For assistance in finding a grief counselor that is right for you, there are a number of resources out there. For our Grief Resource Center, written by Dr. Bill Webster, click here.  

For over 50 years, Matthew Funeral Home has been serving the Staten Island community. We can help with almost every aspect of your loved one’s memorial service. Our family is here to serve yours, every step of the way.

Leave a comment
Name*:
Email:
Comment*:
Please enter the numbers and letters you see in the image. Note that the case of the letters entered matters.

Comments

Please wait

Previous Posts

Grief and Dealing With Suicide

When faced with the loss of a loved one, the grief can be devastating. But when a loved one takes their own life, the grief that families feel afterward can often be complicated. According to the A...

Sunlight and Combatting Grief

As the weather gets warmer and summer is on the horizon, it is time for many people to schedule vacations and weekend outings. For people dealing with grief and depression, it may seem difficult to...

Grief and Selfishness

Grief is a complex emotional state. For many people, grief can bring out different sides of us. And while grief is not an excuse to act out, or be a bad person, it can often be a defense mechanism....

The First Mother's Day Without Her

Mother’s Day is a time we celebrate those who devoted their lives to caring for us, and for bringing us into the world. But it can also be a solemn reminder after the passing of your mother. The lo...

Can I be Both Cremated and Buried?

While most people assume you have to choose between burial or cremation at the end of life, there are more options available. One is to choose both. You can choose burial and cremation together. Be...

Retiring In Stages

Retiring at 65 has been a common aspect of the American lifestyle for generations, but full retirement at that age may not be in the cards for everyone. With costs of living consistently on the ris...

Funeral Planning for the LGBTQ+ Community

When it comes to end-of-life services, it is important to have a plan in order. This can be especially true for many LGBTQ+ people. In the event of your passing, your wishes should be upheld for yo...

Identifying Signs of A Stroke

Stroke is a leading cause of death in the US, killing 1 person in America every 3.5 minutes. The risk of stroke can increase as you age. For the safety of you and your loved ones, it is important t...

Donating Your Body To Science

Body donation is a process that very few Americans decide to participate in. But, it is a practice that can lead to advances in medical science, improved medical training procedures, and more. This...

Using Coping Mechanisms for Grief

When you hear the term “Coping Mechanism,” it is often in a negative context. However, that is not always the case. Coping mechanisms can help you deal with the short-term effects of grief. When us...